Blizzard Disaster Preparedness

Blizzard Disaster PreparednessAs beautiful as new fallen snow can be, it can also be disruptive, destructive, and deadly.  Heavy snow on roadways can make for dangerous driving.  Snow on power lines can also cause power outages that can last for days.  Being prepared for heavy snowfall and having extra emergency supplies on hand is the best way to make sure your family stays safe both during and after the storm.

Everybody remembers the Blizzard of 2013.  Parts of Long Island had over 30 inches of snow.  People were trapped in their homes for days.  While going stir crazy is normal, driving in those conditions were especially tough.  Our customers suffered more automobile accidents than homeowner losses.  So remember, if you must drive here are some safety tips:

  • Prepare your car. Make sure your battery is fully charged and antifreeze fluid is topped off. Make sure your tires have sufficient tread and proper inflation pressure. Fill the windshield washer reservoir with fresh antifreeze washer fluid and check for worn out wiper blades
       
  • Inventory your emergency equipment. Carry a flashlight and extra batteries, and a sturdy ice scraper and a brush or small broom for clearing snow form your vehicle. A collapsible shovel and a bag of sand are handy for freeing the car from snow banks. Make sure you have blankets for keeping warm if you are stranded.
       
  • Lengthen your following distance and leave more space in general between your car and others so you’ll have more room to stop or maneuver in an emergency. Keep your head up and try to anticipate what other cars will do. Assume they will suddenly swerve in your direction and be ready for it.
       
  • Watch for hidden ice on the road. Those warning signs about freezing conditions on bridges refer to times like these. Ice tends to form first on bridges, so slow down and avoid sudden maneuvers while crossing them
       
  • Steer like a rally driver. If your car begins to slide, turn the steering wheel in the direction of the skid to regain traction. Gradually and smoothly, straighten the wheel as the car recovers. Steering into the skid is important, but don’t forget the recovery.

 

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Basic Emergency Supply Kit:

  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day for three days (both drinking and sanitation)
  • Food, three-day supply, non-perishable
  • Battery or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries
  • Flashlights and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle
  • Dust mask, plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags, plastic ties (personal sanitation)
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Local paper maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

 

Family Communication Plan:

  • Your family may not be together, plan how you will contact one another.
  • Create a contact card for all family members and keep them in a wallet, purse, backpack, briefcase, etc.
  • Check emergency plans with your children’s day care or school.
  • Identify a non-local friend or relative household members can notify when they are safe, they may be in a better position to communicate between separated families.
  • If you have a cell phone, program that person(s) as "ICE" (In Case of Emergency) in your phone. If you are in an accident, emergency personnel will often check your ICE listings in order to get a hold of someone you know.
  • Text messages can often get around network disruptions when a phone call might not be able to get through.

HERE ARE SOME LINKS TO HELP YOU PREPARE AND STAY SAFE:

WE CARE ABOUT YOUR SAFETY! PLEASE LET US KNOW IF WE CAN DO ANYTHING, WE ARE HERE FOR YOU. PLEASE TAKE CARE, HEED THE WARNINGS AND STAY SAFE!!